Light that dispels darkness and gloom

Religious Significance

Light that dispels darkness and gloom

Deepavali, the festival of lights, is celebrated on the new moon day, marking the end of Ashwin month and heralding the month of Kartika. The festival runs upto five days.

Deepavali gives a chance to celebrate five ceremonious occasions. It begins on Aswayuja Bahula Chaturdashi and comes to an end on Kartika Shudha Vijaya. The first day of Deepavali is Dhan Trayodashi or Dhanteras. Dhan means wealth and Trayodashi means 13th day. This day is an auspicious day for shopping gold and utensils. This day is also regarded as the Jayanti of God Dhanvantri who came into being during the churning process, which happened between the gods and demons. 

On the second day of Deepavali is Naraka Chaturdashi. This is the day when Lord Krishna killed demon Narakasura. His victory signifies good over evil and how light takes over darkness. The third day is the most important day for many people. It is the day of Laxmi Pooja. Goddess Laxmi is worshiped for wealth. Lord Ganesha is also worshiped by some, to mark the beginning of many things. Thus, prosperity and well being are the highlights of this day.

In South India, the third day is Bali Padyami day, which commemorates the victory of Vishnu in his dwarf form, Vamana, over demon king Bali. The fourth day is devoted to Govardhan Pooja. It is the day Krishna defeated Indra, the deity of thunder and rain. The fifth day is Bhai Dooj, which is the day to honour the brother-sister relationship. This is mostly celebrated on a big scale in North India. Deepavali also celebrates the return of Lord Rama along with his wife Sita and brother Lakshmana to Ayodhya after a 14-year exile.

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