Colleges' error costs vet students dear

Colleges' error costs vet students dear

The future of over 70 veterinary science “graduates” from Government Veterinary colleges at Shimoga and Hassan, hangs in the balance as their colleges stand unrecognised by the Veterinary Council of India and their certificates invalid.

Addressing the mediapersons here on Wednesday, the Student Action Committee of the two colleges demanded that the colleges established under the Karnataka Veterinary Animal and Fisheries Science University (KVAFSU) be given recognition immediately.

The RTI filed by the Committee revealed that ever since the two colleges were established at Shimoga and Hassan in 2006 and 2008 respectively, both colleges had been continually denied recognition by the VCI on various counts. These included absence of a hospital space, poor infrastructure, lack of teaching and non-teaching staff.

The RTI further revealed that in 2008 the VCI had ordered both colleges to stop further intake of students until the colleges got the recognition. Despite these orders, the colleges continued the admissions.

“The student body had approached the college in 2008 questioning their continued intake of students. The college authorities had said that they had ample time to get recognition as it was a five-year course. Unfortunately, for the students’ this has not happened” said Pritish, a graduate from the Shimoga College.

Chetan, another graduate said “we are nothing more than PU pass students today due to the government goof up. We are unable to get any jobs, there are many openings but of the four colleges only students from the Bangalore and Bidar colleges will have a chance”.

The Vice Chancellor of KVAFSU Dr Renukaprasad said that the university authorities had been making all efforts to get recognition from the VCI. “We have made an effort to get the appropriate infrastructure in place. Likewise, the posts of all teaching and non teaching staff has been filled in accordance with the VCI’s requirements.

We should get recognition as more than 80 per cent of the requirements have been fulfilled,” he added.

Renukaprasad said that the graduated students would have to wait for at least another month as their fate would be decided by the Supreme Court in a hearing coming up next month.

Students are themselves looking at legal options. “We have met legal experts and they are going to file writs on our behalf,” said Mallikarjun, a graduate from the 2011 batch.

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