For the welfare of the entire world

Delhi's Ramakrishna Mission was established in 1927 with the ceremonial brick from Belur Math

For the welfare of the entire world

After Sri Ramakrishna’s Mahasamadhi, Swami Vivekananda travelled throughout the length and breadth of India and came in contact with every segment of Indian society – rich and poor, educated and uneducated, strong and weak. This first-hand experience gave him an intimate knowledge and understanding of the spiritual moorings of the nation, the underlying ideals of India.

In 1893, Vivekananda went to USA, participated in the World Parliament of Religions held in Chicago and talked about his observations. He preached Vedanta extensively in America and Europe and returned to India. Soon after, he established the Ramakrishna Mission with the twin ideals of ‘Atmano Mokshartham Jagad hitaya cha’ - for the freedom of the self and for the good of the world.

From here onwards, started the journey of Ramkrishna Mission, which has at present 173 branches all across the world including the national Capital. 

The history of Ramkrishna Ashram in Delhi dates back to 1927 when a centre called Sri Ramakrishna Math was opened at Delhi in a rented house at 966, Garstin Baston Road. It was in 1934 the first brick of the foundation was carried from Belur Math to Delhi. A building was constructed and opened ceremonially. 
However, the Delhi Centre of the Ramakrishna Mission was actually established in its own premises in 1935. 

But what is more popular is Ramkrishna Temple in Panchkuian Road. The foundation stone of the beautiful temple with the main shrine and the natmandir (sanctum santorum) was laid by Swami Shankarananda, the seventh President of the Ramakrishna Order in 1954.  

Here, the consecration and prana-pratishtha of the image of Sri Ramakrishna was performed by Swami Shankarananda, in1957, in the presence of a large number of monks and devotees who had come from various parts of India. 

Today, the place is lot more than a temple. There is a Sadhu Niwas for visiting monks and two auditoriums to host several cultural and spiritual programmes. 

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