Local docs to revive Jayanagar Hospital

Private medicos volunteer to serve as visiting specialists


Around 30 doctors from Jayanagar came together at Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research  recently to brainstorm about ways and means to breathe a new life into Jayanagar General Hospital. Interestingly, although invitation for the meeting was sent out to 120 doctors, only 25 per cent turned up.
It was felt that although the hospital had all necessary infrastructure, the facilities were being under-utilised.

Apparently, there are only 17 specialists who are stretched to work in the casualty ward because of lack of qualified doctors.
Director of Sri Jayadeva Hospital, Dr C N Manjunath, pointed that the general hospital needed to stock up on basic drugs, medicines and amenities like anti-rabies vaccine, antibiotics, blood tests and ECGs. “To get sanctioned posts filled, the hospital head requires the State government’s permission. However, they can recruit people on contract basis to meet the demand till then,” he said.
Manjunath also suggested creating a governing council which will simplify procedures and hasten sanctions for necessary requirements.

Jayanagar MLA B N Vijaykumar, who initiated the discussion, said within a fortnight he would organise a visit for all the doctors who were willing to contribute and help improve the hospital. “My request to the doctors is to give some time to Jayanagar hospital by enlisting as visiting specialists. This will help the patients immensely,” he said.

Faculty members from IIM-Bangalore showed interest in extending managerial help the hospital might require.

Another doctor observed that there were no health camps being conducted for slum-dwellers in Jayanagar area. There was a proposal to introduce smart cards for slum-dwellers in the area.

While Dr Narasimha Murthy of Sunayana Hospital said he would support the Ophthalmology block of the hospital, senior paediatrician Dr Benakappa said that facilities and specialists from Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health Hospital could be utilised for paediatric-related problems.

An official from the hospital agreed that there was a shortage of specialist doctors.
“We need specialists for the ICU. Currently, physicians are looking after the patients there. We require three to four doctors and an equal number of nurses for the ICU,” the official said, adding that the initiative taken to improve the manpower problem in the hospital was a positive step.

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