Split imminent in COMED-K

Split imminent in COMED-K


Highly placed sources in the Karnataka Examinations Authority (KEA) told Deccan Herald that the government felt that the request by some private managements to allow non-Karnataka candidates to participate in CET admissions was reasonable.
“The government has accepted the idea of allowing non-Karnataka students to be admitted via CET as reasonable. We think around 10 per cent of the seats for non-Karnataka students is a reasonable bargain,” sources said.

A large number of private college managements are happy with the idea of a common CET and had agreed to the proposition. If the unified CET becomes a reality, around 60 per cent of seats will be with the government, 25 per cent with management, 5 per cent for the NRI quota and 10 per cent for non-Karnataka students.
Most managements believe in single CET because they had trouble filling their seats. But a few powerful managements are impeding the process,” the sources added.
However, an acceptable fee structure has not yet been arrived at, but the government is willing to concede a few reasonable demands.

“The fee structure will be up for discussion only in January as our minister (Aravind Limbavali) is busy with elections. Again there is a case for a reasonable concession,” the sources said.

Concern
Private college managements had expressed concern about the government’s reluctance to allow non-Karnataka students to be admitted through CET at a meeting held at the KEA last week.

The smaller colleges from Tier 1 and Tier 2 cities in particular had made a case for a unified CET with the intake of non-Karnataka students and a reasonable fee structure.
The managements had also expressed concern about the fact that over 8,000 seats had remained unfilled after COMED-K counselling.

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