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‘Shivamma Yarehanchinala’ movie review: A witty, evocative tale of grit and resilience

'Shivamma Yarehanchinala' boasts a cast of non-actors and they are brilliant. But one wonders what it took for them to deliver the nuanced performances that come easily to professional actors.
Last Updated : 14 June 2024, 13:07 IST

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Shivamma Yarehanchinala
20241 hr 46 min
3.5/5
Director:Jaishankar Aryar
Cast:Sharanamma Chetti, Shivu Abbegere, Chennamma Abbegere, Shruthi Kondenahalli

While many films talk about the evils of capitalism, Jaishankar Aryar's Shivamma Yarehanchinala takes an amused look at how multi-level marketing firms can create employment in a rural setting. He takes no sides in this satire, and asks important questions about survival and hope.

Set in north Karnataka, the film is about 44-year-old Shivamma (Sharanamma Chetti) who shoulders the responsibility of her bedridden husband, a daughter ready for marriage, and a college-going son. She tries to make ends meet by cooking mid-day meals at the government school. Trapped in debt, Shivamma comes across a pyramid scheme selling health supplements which promises great fortune. Where does this lead her?

With sharp dialogues, evocative cinematography and remarkable sound design, the film poignantly captures the aesthetics of rural landscape. An old man looks curiously at two lovers who sit across from each other at a bus stop, talking via SMS. Moments like this elevate the film. Saumyanand Sahi’s camera sensitively captures the different moods of a village and its people.

Shivamma’s quirky and witty responses bring humour to a film that addresses serious questions and explores the many dimensions of aspiration, optimism and empowerment.

Shivamma Yarehanchinala boasts a cast of non-actors and they are brilliant. But one wonders what it took for them to deliver the nuanced performances that come easily to professional actors.

In a bitter and cynical world, Shivamma's optimism to break the shackles of poverty is a win. Even as reality seeps in, Shivamma is adamant about continuing her business. She believes in the health supplements and thinks it is only this business that will pull her out of poverty.

While the sound of the mixer that continues well into the end-credits of the film stays in the minds of the audience, a question remains — is it Shivamma who wins or the capitalism entering hitherto sheltered rural spaces?

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Published 14 June 2024, 13:07 IST

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