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Scientist highlights urban greenery's role against climate change

The event, attended by approximately 25 enthusiasts, coincided with Heritage Day celebrations, offering participants a glimpse into the city’s rich arboreal legacy
Last Updated : 21 April 2024, 00:53 IST
Last Updated : 21 April 2024, 00:53 IST

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The National Gallery of Modern Art Museum on Saturday, hosted ‘Ar-bo-re-tum,’ a tree walk led by B S Chandrashekhar, a scientist at the Institute of Wood Science and Technology in Bengaluru on Saturday.

The event, attended by approximately 25 enthusiasts, coincided with Heritage Day celebrations, offering participants a glimpse into the city’s rich arboreal legacy and the pressing need for conservation.

The walk shed light on the city’s evolving landscape and trees’ critical role in mitigating climate change. 

Chandrashekhar stated, “The delayed monsoons we’ve witnessed are undeniable proof that climate change is a stark reality, which is further aggravated by the lack of trees and the proliferation of high-rise buildings.”

Throughout the guided tour, Chandrashekhar emphasised the importance of fostering a deep-rooted passion for trees, as they are the essence of life on our planet.

“No plant is a weed,” he said.

“Every species contributes to the earth’s ecosystem by providing us with the oxygen we breathe,” he added.

The event showcased diverse trees of about 150-200 varieties, some of which have stood tall for decades, taking 40 to 50 years to reach their majestic statures. The discussion delved into the unique properties of different tree species, such as jamun wood’s suitability for furniture due to its non-splitting nature. Attendees were also explained about exotic trees that thrive in the city’s climate, including the rain tree and the cactus-like euphorbia.

Chandrashekhar also highlighted the contrasting properties of trees from different regions. While exotic species like Pine are known for their rapid growth, trees in temperate countries often have softer wood, necessitating the use of hardwood varieties like teak and rosewood for India’s construction needs. He cautioned that humidity can cause certain woods, such as pine, to crack, making them unsuitable for the Indian climate.

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Published 21 April 2024, 00:53 IST

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