Knowledge of Juvenile Justice Act stressed

Knowledge of  Juvenile Justice Act stressed

Police Commissioner Sunil Agarwal advised fellow officers to focus on learning the legal procedures and provisions related to children and women’s rights in order to perform better and protect them.

He was speaking at day-long workshop on ‘Child Rights and Juvenile Justice System’ organised jointly by the Karnataka State Children’s Rights Protection Commission and Police Department at the JSS Law here on Monday.

He said that with time being spent on VIP protocol and investigating crime, less time is being awarded to focus on children and women’s rights.

Suggesting police officers to continuously educate themselves with the legal procedures, Agarwal said that the Juvenile Justice Act has been framed to deal with juveniles.

Any person below the age of 18 years will have to be dealt as a juvenile in conflict with law and produced before the juvenile justice board.

As 44 per cent of the country’s population is below the age of 18, we need reform and rehabilitate those who are in conflict with law, he said.

Speaking on the occasion, Member of Children’s Rights Protection Commission, Dr Madhu said Karnataka stands second in terms of violation of children’s rights in the country. He said that sale of children is rampant at bus stands and railway stations.

Urging to end such practise, Dr Madhu said that education should to be provided to protect children’s rights.

Observing that there is no conclusive data collected about children, JSS Law College Principal Prof K S Suresh said that the integrated child development scheme is reaching only around 20 per cent of the children, while 80 per cent are left out.

Furthermore, he expressed that only 60 per cent of the children are protected legally. However, he said that 30-35 laws have been enacted to protect children.

IGP South Zone, A S N Murthy, Additional Superintendent of Police P Venkataswamy, Member of Children’s Rights Protection Commission Mamatha and Juvenile Justice Board member P P Baburaj were present.

DH News ServicePolice Commissioner Sunil Agarwal advised fellow officers to focus on learning the legal procedures and provisions related to children and women’s rights in order to perform better and protect them.

He was speaking at day-long workshop on ‘Child Rights and Juvenile Justice System’ organised jointly by the Karnataka State Children’s Rights Protection Commission and Police Department at the JSS Law here on Monday.

He said that with time being spent on VIP protocol and investigating crime, less time is being awarded to focus on children and women’s rights.

Suggesting police officers to continuously educate themselves with the legal procedures, Agarwal said that the Juvenile Justice Act has been framed to deal with juveniles.

Any person below the age of 18 years will have to be dealt as a juvenile in conflict with law and produced before the juvenile justice board.

As 44 per cent of the country’s population is below the age of 18, we need reform and rehabilitate those who are in conflict with law, he said.

Speaking on the occasion, Member of Children’s Rights Protection Commission, Dr Madhu said Karnataka stands second in terms of violation of children’s rights in the country. He said that sale of children is rampant at bus stands and railway stations.

Urging to end such practise, Dr Madhu said that education should to be provided to protect children’s rights.

Observing that there is no conclusive data collected about children, JSS Law College Principal Prof K S Suresh said that the integrated child development scheme is reaching only around 20 per cent of the children, while 80 per cent are left out.

Furthermore, he expressed that only 60 per cent of the children are protected legally.

However, he said that 30-35 laws have been enacted to protect children.

IGP South Zone, A S N Murthy, Additional Superintendent of Police P Venkataswamy, Member of Children’s Rights Protection Commission Mamatha and Juvenile Justice Board member P P Baburaj were present.

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