A motley of colourful items

Incredible Range

The mela had several stalls which sold a range of products — hand-crafted jewellery, embroidered garments, pen stands, ornaments, and even delicious food items.

Visitors were treated to a wide array of products from which they could choose. Jewellery of different kinds were sold at ‘November Fest’.


From wooden ornaments, such as earrings and necklaces, to crystal and beaded bracelets, the mela seemed to have it all.

Nabamita, who had set up one such stall, said that her jewellery was made by her and had contemporary designs.  “I picked up this skill all by myself. I get materials such as crystals, beads, glass, metal and coral from Kerala,” she said.

Her stall sold earrings, necklace sets and anklets made of these colourful materials. Deepa Elizabeth John and Shruthi, two students, had put up another stall at the mela.

While Shruthi was offering nail-art services, wherein  she painted elaborate designs as a part of a manicure, Deepa sold a range of earrings and pen stands that she had made herself.

The pen stands were made from recycled material, and decorated with colourful scraps: plastic beads, lace, foil and plenty of glitter. The girls also sold bottles of different herbal oils.

Sneha and Barnali’s stall was of a different kind; they were selling garments.  These included hand-embroidered suit pieces, and other ready-made garments as well as sheets, bed covers and saris.

They had also displayed some silver earrings, necklaces, rings and bangles, which were made by Sneha at her workshop in Hyderabad.

The products that were on sale at the ‘November Fest’ were picked from all over the country.Seema Gupta’s stall was an example of this. She sold material and garments from Rajasthan.

“I have some bandhani dress material and kurtis,” she said.  She was also selling some incredibly colourful silver and lac jewellery, which was hand-crafted by artisans from Jaipur.

This included necklace sets, which had both earrings and pendants in a range of colourful materials. One stall which was dedicated to selling eco-friendly products was that of Vijayalakshmi.

These items included composting binds and colourful gift items, which were made from recycled products.  The stall also featured several toys, and Vijayalakshmi admitted to wanting to promote Channapatna toys, which were bold and brightly-coloured and
made from wood.

She added that they were also coloured and polished with vegetable dyes and
natural lacquers, which made them safe and eco-friendly. They included rattles, some puzzles, spinning tops, pencil tops and even a xylophone.  Ornaments like wooden bangles were also available at her stall.

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