Celebration Japanese style

Celebration Japanese style

What could have added more colour and glitz to the celebrations of 60th year of Indo-Japan Diplomatic ties, except traditional performances by Japanese dancers and popular Bollywood actress Dia Mirza marking her presence in the programme.

An evening dedicated to Japan and to celebrate their spirit of survival after facing the Tsunami, the traditional dancers enthusiastically greeted the audience and presented their century old folk music and dance forms.

Wearing colourful outfits, a group of four Japanese women with drums and flutes entered the auditorium from common entrances instead of the wings on stage and then went onto the stage. Singing in their local language the group performed Morioka Sansa Odori, an age old dance of Tohuku, a city in Japan.

  Vibrantly turned out dancers  covered the entire stage performing rhythmically to the beats of ‘taiko’ or drum as it is called in Japanese. Even the musicians matched steps with the dancers. It was a time to rejoice as Japanese expats also got a glimpse of their traditional performing arts once more.

The dancers also performed ‘Senadai Suzume Odori’ also known as the Sparrow Dance, which had originated with the stonemasons who had constructed the Sendai Castle.  Young boys and girls dressed in green and pink, with traditional head gears and paper fans performed with apparently spontaneous moves which no doubt would have been practiced diligently to make it look so effortless.   

Turning it into completely entertaining evening, the Sendai dancers asked youngsters to come on stage and perform along with them. Young girls came forward and matched their footsteps with the Japanese performers. The entire audience stood up to motivate the kids. Senior personnel from Japan Embassy and Japan National Tourism Organisation also applauded the impromptu performers.

Notably, Japan has made tourism as one of their key priorities for uplifting the country’s economy after 2011.  Bollywood actress Dia Mirza was chosen to support the cause. Dia has visited Tohuku twice after tsunami in 2011. She appreciated the level of respect given by the Japanese, natural beauty of Tohuku and its diverse culture, cuisines and art forms. She says, “ I feel a strong connection to this land  and feels privileged to be associated with it.”

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