Bionic eye helps blind man see

51-year-old is first in the world to have such an eye

 
Bionic eye” uses a camera and video processor mounted on a pair of glasses to send captured images wirelessly to a tiny receiver on the outside of the eye. AFPPeter Lane is one of the first people in the world to be fitted with the “bionic eye” which uses a camera and video processor mounted on a pair of glasses to send captured images wirelessly to a tiny receiver on the outside of the eye.

In turn, the receiver passes on the data via a tiny cable to an array of electrodes which sit on the retina-the layer of specialised cells which respond to light found at the back of the eye, according to the scientists.

In fact, Lane is part of a special project at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital and one of just 32 people taking part in an international trial.

“The patients are progressing much faster than we at first thought. A lot of work still needs to be carried out, but this is certainly very encouraging for both the patient and the scientific community,” ophthalmologist Paulo Stangaat was quoted by the British media as saying.

Even Lane, who can now see the outline of objects as a series of dots of light, has been stunned by his progress. “I can see the outline of objects like the door frame or furniture, although not details. I can make out letters though. It was an amazing feeling after not being able to see anything to be seeing letters and words on a special screen. “I was there reading dad, mat, cat. I’m just reading short words at the moment and they try us with smaller letters each time. It’s a start and they’ve said they’ll get me a screen so I can read at home. “The images I see move and that takes a bit of getting used to, but I can see cars- they look like cotton wool. It is exciting to be part of the trial,” Lane said.

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