Inside the Glass House

Celebratory mode

Inside the Glass House

A haven for walkers for all tourists, the Lalbagh Botanical Garden holds a pride of place on the City’s map. The charming Glass House has played host to a number of beautiful horticulture shows over the years. The Glass House, it is said, has turned 125 this year, but has enough been done to commemorate the occasion?

The officials at the Garden seem to present a different picture. Pointing to an official documentation, Joint Director of Horticulture, Parks and Gardens, Dr M Jagadeesh says, “As per the records, the foundation stone for the Glass House was laid by Prince Albert Victor of Wales on November 30, 1889. It was built on the model of the Crystal Palace of London (damaged due to a fire) to attract foreigners. It has completed 126 years of existence now.

For all monuments and historical structures, the norm is to celebrate the silver, diamond and centenary. As for the Glass House, the centenary celebrations were already held in 1989 in a big and meaningful way by the Department of Horticulture in coordination with the Mysore Horticultural Society. The next commemoration will be held on the 150th anniversary.” 

He also says that the flower shows held biannually on Republic Day and Independence Day are major attractions that glorify the Glass House. Recently, the ‘National Landscape Fest’ was also conducted here and it was even host to the National Rose Show. Deputy Director of Horticulture, Lalbagh Gardens, Chandrashekhar, echoes the same opinion. “It is the 126th anniversary as far as I know. We will be marking the 150th and 200th years now. As of now, we will be dedicating the forthcoming January flower show to the 150th birth anniversary of architect GH Krumbiegal, the founder of Mysore Horticultural Society and curator of Lalbagh.”

Suryaprakash, the photographer at the structure who has been there since 25 years, says that several prestigious shows happen at the Glass House including small orange, mango and apple shows. “The Glass House is an important part of Lalbagh. In my knowledge, it is 126 years old. However, any and every celebration is a matter that the concerned authorities need to look into.”

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