Children to learn to fight corruption

 Delhi schools aim to spread a strong message against corruption among students during the vigilance awareness week starting the month-end.

The Central Vigilance Commission (CVC) has requested the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) to observe October 29  to November 3 as the vigilance awareness week focussing on a theme of Transparency in Public Procurement across its affiliated schools.

The week is observed in memory of Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel, Bismarck of India.
“Corruption has become a national issue. It is an evil that has spread its roots throughout our system and affects all walks of life.

There is a need to bring transparency in public procurement and proper dealing of corruption prevailing in it. The future of a nation, that is students, need to be sensitised about this core issue,” reads the CBSE circular sent to schools on Monday.

Schools have been asked to hold activities such as poster-making and essay competitions for classes 6 to 8, lectures and essay writing for classes 9 and 10, debates and seminars for classes 11 and 12.

Some suggestions for the topics of activities given by the vigilance commission include consumer awareness, food adulteration and awareness, consumer rights and its importance, role of media in bringing public awareness, if e-payment is an effective tool in reducing corruption and Right to Information and transparency in public procurement.

“Children are aware and involved in what is happening in the society. Vigilance and values are interconnected. We need to sensitise our children towards existing corruption in different areas such as consumerism, politics, industries, markets and others to help them stand for their rights,” said Ameeta Wattal, principal of Springdales school, Pusa Road.

Wattal added that such issues — instead of discussing only during the Vigilance Awareness Week — should become talking points round-the-year in a bid to sensitise children. 

L V Sehgal, principal of Bal Bharati Public School, Ganga Ram Hospital Marg, echoed similar views.

“The message will reach out to a larger section of society if children are given the freedom to talk about such issues at the school level. Schools will have to put across such topics in the right perspective by giving a balanced view about politics or industries,” he said.


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