And govt said, let there be no light

And govt said, let there be no light


The total demand for power is 130 million units while the supply is just 118 mu -- a gap of 12 mu.

Many areas of Bangalore and other cities have been experiencing two to four hours of load shedding, especially during peak hours.

The worst hit are the rural areas. Nearly 12 to 14 hours’ load-shedding has badly affected the rural populace and agricultural activities.

Interestingly, Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappa had recently announced a new schedule for load-shedding for the year: Uninterrupted supply in Bangalore and 14 hours’ supply in rural areas. He had assured quality supply even if the government had to purchase power. Though Energy Minister K S Eshwarappa said on Tuesday that there will be one-hour load-shedding in Bangalore, Bescom claimed in a release that there will be no power cut in the City.

Unable to cope with the situation, the State Energy Department is now knocking the Centre’s door. Department Principal Secretary K Jairaj met Central officials on Tuesday and urged them to at least provide the State with its full share of power from the Central grid.

“The State’s share from the Central grid is 1,500 mega watt. We are getting around 1,200 MW. If the Centre provides us the complete share, the situation will improve,” officials said.

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