New shape shifting antennas


These new antennas are made by injecting an alloy made up of the metals gallium and indium— which remains in liquid form at room temperature— into very small channels the width of a human hair, says Michael Dickey, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU) and the study co-author.

The channels are hollow, like a straw, with openings at either end- but can be of any shape.
Once the alloy has filled the channel, the surface of the alloy oxidises, creating a “skin” that holds the alloy in place while allowing it to retain its liquid properties.

Liked the story?

  • 0

    Happy
  • 0

    Amused
  • 0

    Sad
  • 0

    Frustrated
  • 0

    Angry