A reflection of local customs

Suggi Sambrama

A reflection of local customs

The students of Acharya Institute of Graduate Studies recently organised a programme called
Suggi Sambrama on the college campus. Through this fest of sorts, the students sought to spread more awareness about the local culture among the foreign students of the institute.

The students made every effort to make the programme as authentic as possible — whether it was through playing a variety of Kannada tunes or dressing in the attire of the region.

There is quite a large number of international students in the college, who make every effort to celebrate and promote their own festivals on campus. It was from this that the idea of Suggi Sambrama originated. The local students decided to organise an occasion that would clearly depict the lifestyle and culinary habits of South
India. The programme was inaugurated by the principal of the college. A large gathering of students — from
Karnataka, other parts of the country and from overseas as well — gathered to celebrate Suggi Sambrama. In fact, many of the international students actually took part in the festivities themselves, getting a taste of the local culture. A group of students from Africa danced to the Kannada tune Gallu Gallenutha, which had the audience cheering and singing along. Some of the students also presented a few dances, which set the tone for the fest. The students added an authentic touch to the event by organising a special treat for some of the faculty members of the college — a ride on a bullock cart, which was decorated with flowers and sugarcane. It added the perfect touch to the ceremony by giving a rustic, rural feel which many of the international students hadn’t experienced so far during their stay in this country.

Chikku, a student from Tajikistan, was delighted by the colourful display put up for their benefit. “It was very exciting. We mingled with the local students and enjoyed the celebration. It was
touching to see the part of the programme where everyone thanked Mother Nature for everything she has given us,” says Chikku.

The students also went the extra mile to dress the part. While the boys turned up in shirts and dhotis, the girls draped themselves in elegant saris. They decorated the college premises with rangolis, in the shape of butterflies and seashells. A model of suggi — which essentially refers to fresh crops — was also made and displayed proudly. Ashutosh, a student from Mauritius, admits that the festival gave the college’s international community the perfect opportunity to acquaint themselves with local customs and rituals. He believes that through events such as this, the students get a taste of the rural aspects of this country. “This festival helped us to see beyond Bangalore and understand the traditional richness of  Karnataka,” he sums up.

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