Sanskrit turns go-to language of Gen Next for mental peace

Sanskrit turns go-to language of Gen Next for mental peace

Sanskrit turns go-to language of Gen Next for mental peace

Foreign language courses may be popular with the GenX. But India’s own - Sanskrit, one of the world’s oldest languages, is making a comeback in a big way.

People are rediscovering the merits of the language, once thought to be dead, thanks to its rich heritage and cultural value.

Sanskrit enthusiasts are spreading the language far and wide and it is now on a revival path. 

At the Bhooneela Venkateshwara Swami temple, BEML Layout, Brookfields, people from IT, finance, medical and other backgrounds had gathered on August 28 for the closing ceremony of the basic 10-day free spoken Sanskrit course. A Sanskrit play was staged and students thanked their teacher, Bhawana Purohit, for teaching them Sanskrit, the easy way. Once strangers to the language, they can now converse in Sanskrit without much difficulty.

Purohit, a resident of Hoodi, has been teaching the language for the last 13 years. She has conducted more than 70 such free courses, benefiting over 1,000 people.

“The demand for the course has increased over the last few years and most learners are from the IT and medical fields,” said the 34-year-old teacher who is associated with Samskrita Bharati, a non-governmental organisation that offers Sanskrit courses.

Dr Ganapathi Hegde, founder, Mythree Samskrutha Study Centre, said there are several from the IT field who opt for these classes.

“They say that they find peace in learning the language. Many have taken to meditation. Several recitations that are taught in yoga classes as well are in Sanskrit. They feel learning Sanskrit can help them understand the meaning of the verses taught there better,” he said.

The centre conducts classes that help one learn Sanskrit in quick time (two hours each for 12 days between 6 pm and 8 pm).  “We use more of audio visuals to teach students as it helps one learn fast. Students do not even have to use pen and paper during these sessions,” Hegde said.

For many, it is a passion to learn an Indian language that drives them to the class. For a few, it helps decode the vedic scriptures. “Parents who want their children to learn shlokas (hymns) also send them to the Sanskrit classes. They want the children to understand what the verses mean,” he added.

World Sanskrit Day (Vishwa Samskrita Diwas) is annually celebrated on the Shravan Purnima day. Samskrita Bharati, Girinagar, as a part of the celebrations, will hold a workshop on September 3 on its premises, on the history and roots of the language.

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